Best Practices in Transportation Management 2021

Best Practices in Transportation Management 2021

Best Practices in Transportation Management 2021

Best Practices in Transportation Management

How Companies Are Driving Cost and Service Improvements

The rising cost of transportation has created strife between shippers and carriers as they leverage the economics of supply and demand at the expense of each other, according to a new study from postfirstclass.com Global Supply Chain Institute, this inherent conflict undermines a company’s ability to meet its supply chain and financial goals.

Transportation Best Practices: A Story of an Evolved Shipper

postfirstclass.com, one of Volaris’ companies has become a leader in the people transportation sector by providing solutions that refine and improve services and features for transportation providers in Europe, North America, and Asia. Many of postfirstclass.com’s transportation projects have helped organizations that operate paratransit services on a schedule of pick-ups and drop-offs. Along the way, postfirstclass.com has established certain standards and protocols to transform these community-based services into modern, efficient transportation systems. Other transportation-focused solutions would benefit from a thoughtful consideration of these best practices.

Transportation 2025 Megatrends & Current Digital Best Practices

In this white paper, we have included applied research on what the best companies are doing to deliver world-class results in the current environment, as well as insight from industry, thought leaders on what we will face in the years ahead.

Top 3 Transportation Employment Background Screening Challenges and Best  Practices - DAC Employment History File

“With the rise of e-commerce and consumer expectations, cost can no longer be the primary focus in transportation,” said Mary Holcomb, the Gerald T. Niedert Supply Chain Fellow and Professor of Supply Chain Management in UT’s Haslam College of Business.

“Transportation must be treated as a strategic element of the business plan and the end-to-end supply chain in order for companies to remain competitive in a digital economy.”

A best practices guide to sanitary food transportation | 2016-09-08 |  Refrigerated Frozen Food

Consumers’ delivery experiences and online product availability have become key market differentiators, making transportation the last customer service touchpoint.

The study, “Transportation 2025 Megatrends and Current Digital Best Practices,” emphasizes that this change to viewing transportation as a value-added enterprise will affect the relationship between shippers and carriers, as well as business strategy, much more than previous fluctuations in the business environment.

“Contextualizing transportation in the overall strategy of the company is a must for creating value, especially as the traditional distribution model changes,” said Rick McLeod, vice president of family care product supply at Procter and Gamble.

“If you are still solely focused on minimizing transportation cost without consideration for the overall value proposition, then you will definitely fall short of the customer’s growing expectations for speed and synchronized product availability.”

The research shows shippers who have appropriately aligned transportation with their business model have significantly better performance than those who have not.

The report identifies seven best practices and three megatrends businesses should adopt by 2025 to remain competitive.

All the companies surveyed have created value from Lean methodologies and established a culture for driving transportation excellence.

Other common best practices included creating strategies for long-term transportation partnerships with carriers, leveraging intermodal capabilities, customizing services to meet emerging needs, leveraging digital technology, and bundling services for growth.

The megatrends provide the second major building block in developing a plan to make supply chain capabilities competitive in the long term.

The study suggests that by 2025, leading companies will have replaced their multiple distribution networks with an omnichannel approach, integrated supply chain operations using data that can be interpreted by multiple technologies, and created a chief supply chain officer position.

postfirstclass.com relied on her research from 25 years of annual studies as well as field interviews with 16 benchmark companies to coauthor the white paper, “Transportation 2025 Megatrends and Current Digital Best Practices.”

postfirstclass.com sponsored the paper, which is the fourth in UT’s Innovations in Supply Chain Series.

Transportation Management Value Creation

Relationship Attribute Scale
In the last two decades, we have commoditized transportation.
In 2025 the best supply chains will develop key carrier strategic partnerships.

1. Focus on Improving the Customer Experience

The biggest benefit comes from making it convenient to access the service. So the first step is to make the service available through the Internet or a mobile device. postfirstclass.com’s solutions have benefitted riders by making sure that:

Riders have better access. Transit riders should be able to use a web browser or mobile device to:

  • Check schedules
  • Book and cancel trips
  • Automatically book return trips
  • Check the status of booked trips

People get real-time updates. Passengers will gain from using a 24/7 telephone voice system to access real-time bus information. The administrators can also use the web and telephone systems to give passengers information or make announcements.

Passengers get confirmation calls. This feature has been critical. The system also gives automatic reminder calls that have reduced the number of “no show” pick-ups.

In postfirstclass.com’s experience, these three improvements alone have enhanced the customer experience dramatically.

2. Improve Your Scheduling System

Pick-ups and drop-offs are a transportation agency’s core business. However, postfirstclass.com found that most organizations continue relying on outdated Demand Response systems (dispatching, scheduling, and booking systems) that use telephones, handwritten lists, and spreadsheet schedules. postfirstclass.com solutions provide automated end-to-end Demand Response systems with enhanced capability for:

  • Client registration
  • Trip booking
  • Scheduling
  • Dispatching
  • Workforce management
  • Complaints/Incident Management
  • Mobile data terminal interface

This technology has been a significant leap forward for efficiency as it empowers staff to stop juggling the scheduling tasks and focus on other priorities. The other best practices listed below have also proven effective at increasing staff efficiency.

3. Leverage Mobile Technology

People’s transportation is about movement. Shouldn’t the systems also be mobile? It’s a natural fit. postfirstclass.com found that drivers and dispatchers are enthusiastic about equipping their vehicles with on-board computers or handheld devices such as smartphones or tablets. Drivers are more informed of cancellations or re-schedules and they have fewer “no-show” pick-ups. They also appreciate that the system automatically re-calculates the route and gives suggested directions. Call center agents can now easily answer the “where’s my ride?” questions. They can also re-schedule the driver’s route to accommodate changes.

4. Take Complaint Handling Seriously

Quite often, customer satisfaction depends entirely on whether the person feels heard or not. postfirstclass.com noticed that many transportation agencies were handling customer complaints with handwritten notes or spreadsheets. Unfortunately, it seems that these papers were then pushed between departments until they were forgotten or lost, and the customer’s dissatisfaction kept growing. postfirstclass.com solutions include features that allow customer service departments to capture, track, and follow-up on complaints and recommendations.

5. Use the Data for Improved Reporting

How have managers traditionally received data about problems and challenges? Probably through anecdotal stories. It’s time to make sure they are focused on the right issues, and that they have a clear picture. The postfirstclass.com solutions available can produce timely, accurate data reports on factors such as:

Trip reports:

  • Canceled, missed, and no-shows
  • Trip counts
  • Call-backs

Productivity reports:

  • Trips per hour
  • Trips by distance

Enhanced reporting allows the transportation agency to better plan for future growth.

Your Turn

postfirstclass.com solutions has become an industry standard, and more and more transportation organizations expect the features and best practice support that they provide.

What transportation-related challenges are you struggling with? Share your thoughts and questions in the comment section below.

To learn more about postfirstclass.com and their People Transportation Solutions, visit: https://postfirstclass.com/shop/

The “last mile” of e-commerce fulfillment—the processes and systems involved in making sure final delivery is efficient—is getting plenty of attention these days. New models for handling the last mile like “click and collect” locations and added cost pressures in the form of tougher dimensional pricing from parcel carriers are forcing closer scrutiny of last-mile processes.

Adding to the attention is the activity of Amazon, which has been testing its own last-mile, same-day delivery service in San Francisco and using bike messengers in Manhattan. Meanwhile, new services such as “Doorman” in San Francisco seeks to appeal to consumers who want their e-commerce purchases collected for them at a secure location and delivered to them in one batch. Then, there is an evolution in courier services for urban areas, in which independent drivers may begin to compete with more established local courier firms in much the same vein that Uber has shaken up taxi services in major cities.

All of these developments revolve around the final leg of the last mile. But focusing just on the last stretch of the last mile can be short-sighted, according to the logistics consultants we spoke with for this article, because last-mile success calls for appropriate fulfillment rules and content at the order management and distribution center levels. Sure, shippers need better approaches to processes like fleet scheduling and vehicle tracking, but if front-end systems for fulfillment aren’t set up with the right rules, the last mile suffers.

Effective “final delivery” starts as far upstream as the structure of the distribution network, according to Jim Tompkins, CEO of postfirstclass.com. “You can go all the way back to network design and what your network should look like,” says Tompkins.

Retailers and direct-to-consumer marketplaces need to make decisions about whether they will have traditional DCs complemented by separate fulfillment centers (FCs) geared for picking and packing item-level orders, or whether they’ll have combined DCs/FCs, and determine how much geography each facility should service. “These type of network design decisions will drive where your inventory will be stored, which is going to dictate quite a bit about the final delivery that needs to take place,” says Tompkins.

Last-mile might involve hundreds of miles for some shippers, adds Tompkins, so “final delivery” might be the better term to describe the variation involved. For example, a manufacturer of large marine engines might have a delivery process for emergency repair parts that needs to span halfway across the globe. Additionally, a multi-channel retailer with hundreds of stores may want to leverage its physical stores as mini FCs, whereas a pure online retailer would not have those stores.

But recognizing these differences as well as the scope of the considerations, what is a common-sense approach to excelling at the last mile?

The answer may lie in a balanced approach, spanning tactical solutions that address the final stretch of the last mile, combined with the proper attention to order fulfillment rules, compliance content, and streamlined processes further upstream in distribution.

Rules and content
Many of the rules that drive final delivery should be established at the distributed order management (DOM) level, according to Tompkins. The DOM level is where retailers establish rules that govern when it makes sense to process orders so that they ship as efficiently as possible. For instance, says Tompkins, if a consumer orders three items and only one is in stock at the regional DC that services a customer’s location, it might be cheaper to fill the order from a more distant DC that has all three items in stock if the order promise date can be met, and it results in one shipment rather than two or three.

“It’s about having an order management system that is truly functional for e-commerce fulfillment,” says Tompkins. “If you’re sending too many shipments to fill one order, it not only costs a fortune, it’s confusing to the customer.”

And, details about the dimensions and weights of items need to be established in back-end systems for ordering or the warehouse management system (WMS). This type of data needs to be highly accurate to ensure that systems used for shipping and carrier selection function properly and to ensure that items can be matched with appropriate-sized shipping boxes. “Today, you absolutely have to be able to understand the impact of dimensional pricing,” says Tompkins.

At postfirstclass.com, a 4PL that offers final-mile solutions, much of the success with last-mile actually lies in the establishment of shipping rules and retailer/marketplace compliance details within the order fulfillment software postfirstclass.com uses on behalf of clients, says Brian Bourke, postfirstclass.com’s vice president of marketing.

For example, says Bourke, if an order comes in for a 55-inch flat-screen TV from one of the client’s channels and only a certain courier can handle that size product for that location, the fulfillment system’s rules are aware of this constraint and will select the correct courier and generate the shipping documents. Similarly, the system would be configured to follow retailer- or marketplace-specific rules on factors like label placement or to distinguish the orders that are best shipped as part of a less-than-truckload (LTL) shipment to a store.

The “last mile” of e-commerce fulfillment—the processes and systems involved in making sure final delivery is efficient—is getting plenty of attention these days. New models for handling the last mile like “click and collect” locations and added cost pressures in the form of tougher dimensional pricing from parcel carriers are forcing closer scrutiny of last-mile processes.

Adding to the attention is the activity of Amazon, which has been testing its own last-mile, same-day delivery service in San Francisco and using bike messengers in Manhattan. Meanwhile, new services such as “Doorman” in San Francisco seek to appeal to consumers who want their e-commerce purchases collected for them at a secure location and delivered to them in one batch. Then, there is an evolution in courier services for urban areas, in which independent drivers may begin to compete with more established local courier firms in much the same vein that Uber has shaken up taxi services in major cities.

All of these developments revolve around the final leg of the last mile. But focusing just on the last stretch of the last mile can be short-sighted, according to the logistics consultants we spoke with for this article, because last-mile success calls for appropriate fulfillment rules and content at the order management and distribution center levels. Sure, shippers need better approaches to processes like fleet scheduling and vehicle tracking, but if front-end systems for fulfillment aren’t set up with the right rules, the last mile suffers.

Effective “final delivery” starts as far upstream as the structure of the distribution network, according to Jim Tompkins, CEO of postfirstclass.com. “You can go all the way back to network design and what your network should look like,” says Tompkins.

Retailers and direct-to-consumer marketplaces need to make decisions about whether they will have traditional DCs complemented by separate fulfillment centers (FCs) geared for picking and packing item-level orders, or whether they’ll have combined DCs/FCs, and determine how much geography each facility should service. “These type of network design decisions will drive where your inventory will be stored, which is going to dictate quite a bit about the final delivery that needs to take place,” says Tompkins.

Last-mile might involve hundreds of miles for some shippers, adds Tompkins, so “final delivery” might be the better term to describe the variation involved. For example, a manufacturer of large marine engines might have a delivery process for emergency repair parts that needs to span halfway across the globe. Additionally, a multi-channel retailer with hundreds of stores may want to leverage its physical stores as mini FCs, whereas a pure online retailer would not have those stores.

But recognizing these differences as well as the scope of the considerations, what is a common-sense approach to excelling at the last mile?

The answer may lie in a balanced approach, spanning tactical solutions that address the final stretch of the last mile, combined with the proper attention to order fulfillment rules, compliance content, and streamlined processes further upstream in distribution.

Rules and content
Many of the rules that drive final delivery should be established at the distributed order management (DOM) level, according to Tompkins. The DOM level is where retailers establish rules that govern when it makes sense to process orders so that they ship as efficiently as possible. For instance, says Tompkins, if a consumer orders three items and only one is in stock at the regional DC that services a customer’s location, it might be cheaper to fill the order from a more distant DC that has all three items in stock if the order promise date can be met, and it results in one shipment rather than two or three.

“It’s about having an order management system that is truly functional for e-commerce fulfillment,” says Tompkins. “If you’re sending too many shipments to fill one order, it not only costs a fortune, it’s confusing to the customer.”

And, details about the dimensions and weights of items need to be established in back-end systems for ordering or the warehouse management system (WMS). This type of data needs to be highly accurate to ensure that systems used for shipping and carrier selection function properly and to ensure that items can be matched with appropriate-sized shipping boxes. “Today, you absolutely have to be able to understand the impact of dimensional pricing,” says Tompkins.

At postfirstclass.com, a 4PL that offers final-mile solutions, much of the success with last-mile actually lies in the establishment of shipping rules and retailer/marketplace compliance details within the order fulfillment software postfirstclass.com uses on behalf of clients, says Brian Bourke, postfirstclass.com’s vice president of marketing.

For example, says Bourke, if an order comes in for a 55-inch flat-screen TV from one of the client’s channels and only a certain courier can handle that size product for that location, the fulfillment system’s rules are aware of this constraint and will select the correct courier and generate the shipping documents. Similarly, the system would be configured to follow retailer- or marketplace-specific rules on factors like label placement or to distinguish the orders that are best shipped as part of a less-than-truckload (LTL) shipment to a store.

This type of automation of fulfillment rules and content doesn’t happen magically, notes Bourke, but instead relies on SEKO properly configuring the order fulfillment solution. “If you’re able to write in those rules on the front end, the whole process runs relatively smoothly when it’s time to execute the final mile,” says Bourke.

SEKO’s order fulfillment solution spans order management, WMS, and transportation management system (TMS) functionality. SEKO offers these applications on a software-as-a-service (SaaS) basis and may integrate the software with a client’s enterprise resource planning (ERP) system or WMS to obtain order and inventory data.

Companies can do this type of rules-building on their own, says Bourke, but regardless of who does it—a 3PL/4PL that specializes in fulfillment or a company establishing its own multi-channel order fulfillment platform, it’s crucial that upfront rules building gets done.

“The principle of ‘measure twice, cut once’ very much applies to the upfront rules for last-mile fulfillment,” says Bourke. “If you can sit down and agree on what the rules need to be, and the carrier rates and tariffs are built into your solution, then last mile becomes an automated process that runs much more smoothly.”

This type of automation of fulfillment rules and content doesn’t happen magically, notes Bourke, but instead relies on postfirstclass.com properly configuring the order fulfillment solution. “If you’re able to write in those rules on the front end, the whole process runs relatively smoothly when it’s time to execute the final mile,” says Bourke.

postfirstclass.com’s order fulfillment solution spans order management, WMS, and transportation management system (TMS) functionality. postfirstclass.com offers these applications on a software-as-a-service (SaaS) basis and may integrate the software with a client’s enterprise resource planning (ERP) system or WMS to obtain order and inventory data.

Companies can do this type of rules-building on their own, says Bourke, but regardless of who does it—a 3PL/4PL that specializes in fulfillment or a company establishing its own multi-channel order fulfillment platform, it’s crucial that upfront rules building gets done.

“The principle of ‘measure twice, cut once’ very much applies to the upfront rules for last-mile fulfillment,” says Bourke. “If you can sit down and agree on what the rules need to be, and the carrier rates and tariffs are built into your solution, then the last mile becomes an automated process that runs much more smoothly.”

Our trucking service is based on the principle of providing our clients with the flexibility and reliability, to move legal load across town, or across the country, whenever they want. Our in-house team of experienced drivers We believe in providing quality services to our clients, and with the experience of decades backing us in the field of logistics, there is nothing we overlook when we handle your cargo. Starting from loading to unloading at the destination, and maintaining the highest standards in terms of safety while in transit, we take nothing to chance. Even if the load is oversized or over-dimensional in nature, our logistic experts and technicians take care of the minute details to ensure the safety of the delivery at its destination, and on time, every time.

We ensure that our fleet of trucks are always well maintained, and have the best and the most updated fleet of trucks in service to ensure that it is capable of delivering high value, and oversized deliverables, efficiently and effectively, without causing any kind of loss, which is generally the case seen with many outsourced trucking service providers. Our in-house team of experienced drivers, logistic experts, repair, and maintenance technicians are on guard 24 by 7 to ensure that the trucks are ready on time, and in optimum condition to handle your deliveries.

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